Archive for Thursday, June 29, 2000

Tackling the issue of the separation of church and state

Editorial

June 29, 2000

It's good to know that a recent U. S. Supreme Court decision won't hinder Eudora's athletes from praying prior to games in September.

The Supreme Court ruled it a violation of the constitution to allow student-led prayers over the loudspeaker prior to football games. We agree. The separation of church and state is an integral part of the plan brought forth by this country's founding fathers.

The freedom of religion guarantees the right of every American to worship freely without fear of political reprisal. It is a basic right that should never be taken for granted. That the court protected it so vigorously should be applauded.

We are also glad to see that the restrictions go no further than the loudspeakers. Religion has always played a key role in the unity and togetherness of most football games from high school to college to the National Football League.

Anyone who has ever had the opportunity to put on the pads or be a part of a locker room scene before and after a football game knows that prayer is both commonplace and revered.

That won't change.

Teams will continue to kneel together in prayer.

And, it will be done voluntarily. Anyone not wishing to take part needs only to leave the room, without fear of scrutiny and reprisal from his teammates. Of course, most high school students, out of respect for their teammates and team, would quietly bow their heads even if they didn't share the same religious beliefs.

We understand the reasoning.

Religion should not be forced upon anyone. Doing so goes against everything on which this country was founded.

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