Archive for Thursday, March 15, 2001

Chips not included

Senor Stan’s select salsa slipping into stores everywhere

March 15, 2001

Just north of the border, the smell of Mexican salsa fills the air. Inside a small house located at the Tree Berry Farms, tomatoes, jalapenos, onions and other items mix together to make a savory sauce.

Wait a minute north of the border?

Stan Schneck is shareholder and president of Senor Stan's Hombre Salsa. His salsa is made just north of Eudora across the Leavenworth and Douglas County line. After five years of business, the independent businessman can say with pride that his salsa has made an impact on the area.

Stan Schneck, shareholder and president of Senor Stan's Hombre
Salsa, makes his salsa north of Eudora across the Leavenworth and
Douglas County line. After five years of business, the independent
businessman now distributes to many area stores and is planning for
nationwide industrial distribution soon.

Stan Schneck, shareholder and president of Senor Stan's Hombre Salsa, makes his salsa north of Eudora across the Leavenworth and Douglas County line. After five years of business, the independent businessman now distributes to many area stores and is planning for nationwide industrial distribution soon.

"Basically, we're in nearly every store in the market," Schneck said. "From Manhattan to Kansas City and all points in between."

Schneck is also in negotiations with national food distributor, Alliant, to ship his salsa in gallon jugs for industrial use.

Before his salsa syndicate days, Schneck worked as a house painter. Schneck said whenever he came across a salsa, none seemed to satisfy his snacking tastes.

"I thought 'man, this isn't good,'" he said.

Eventually, a friend's mother, who was of Mexican descent, showed him how to make salsa. He then realized the potential his sauce could have but only after a little persuasion.

"My friends would come over and say 'man, that's good. You need to sell it,'" Schneck said.

Though he may be biased, Schneck sides with his friends' opinions of the salsa.

"As far as I'm concerned, there's not a better salsa in the store you can buy," he said. "Once you try it, you're hooked."

When it comes to the future, Schneck is planning to move within Eudora to continue his operation. Plans will soon be before the Eudora Planning and Zoning Commission to approve Schneck's idea of moving into town.

The move will require a change in zoning for the property he hopes to rent, but he is hopeful Eudora residents and officials will make the move possible.

"We've pretty much outgrown this facility," Schneck said of Tree Berry Farms. "We're selling it faster than we can make it."

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