Archive for Thursday, January 18, 2001

Eudora students fare well overall in state assessment

January 18, 2001

The state report cards are in for Eudora's schools, reflecting well on its schools and their teaching methods. However, there is always room for improvement.

The report cards are used as a "snapshot" of a school's performance. The information is taken from data complied from the Kansas mathematics and writing assessment tests, set forth by the Kansas State Board of Education.

At Eudora West Elementary (EWE), fourth-graders were tested on mathematics. Of 102 students tested, 55.1 percent scored satisfactory versus the state average of 53.8 percent. Only 7 percent scored unsatisfactory, down from the state average of 14.4 percent. EWE fifth-graders were tested on reading. Of 97 students, 85.4 percent scored satisfactory, or 4.2 percent higher than the stage average of 81.2 percent. Five percent scored unsatisfactory versus the state average of 13.7 percent.

Eudora Middle School (EMS) seventh-graders were tested on mathematics. Eighty-one students were tested and scored 59.1 percent satisfactorily, compared to the state average of 52.1 percent. Seven percent scored unsatisfactory, 12.2 percent blow the state's 19.2 percent average.

Eighty-nine eighth-graders at EMS were tested on reading. Of those students, 83.2 percent scored satisfactory, higher than the state average of 81.4 percent. Unsatisfactory scores at EMS were slightly higher than the state average with 12 percent versus 11.5 percent.

At Eudora High (EHS), 10th-grade students were tested on mathematics. Of 87 students tested, 48.3 percent scored satisfactory versus the state average of 46.5 percent. Twenty-three percent scored unsatisfactory versus the state average of 29.2 percent. Eleventh-graders at EHS were tested on reading. Out of 73 students, 79.9 percent scored satisfactory, or three-tenths off the state average of 79.6 percent. Fifteen percent scored unsatisfactory compared to the state average of 15.3 percent.

The information used is not intended to compare different schools or different districts. The data is used to allow schools to determine what is needed to align to the state curriculum.

"You can get (the curriculum) up, but you've still got to teach it," said EWE principal Rod Moyer.

Nottingham students do not take state reading or math assessment tests.

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