Archive for Thursday, March 15, 2001

Letters

March 15, 2001

To the editor:

Like all Americans today, I am terribly concerned with the tragedies that are taking place in our schools and homes with our children.

I do not claim to have all the answers, but I have seen the changes in our own community that is only a part of the whole nation.

We have a good school system here and I'm sure the teachers are all concerned at the way attitudes have changed. I have six of my eight great- grandchildren in school, some in each age group, so my thoughts are based on what I hear in the news and read in the papers. The one thing that has always troubled me is the children who never seem to fit in any place and are just left on their own. The neglect comes from the homes, churches and schools. Every child needs someone they can depend on to listen to them. There are plenty of sports for the talented, but not for those who aren't. There are the Girl and Boy Scouts, but even then, not all children can afford the equipment and fees.

I see by the news that the young boy in California felt he was picked on by his peers. That is something that has always been around since my schools days. We have counselors in schools, but are they watching out for the unnecessary torment that some endure? These young people need to be taught how to deal with such treatment.

Since parents have more or less given up their duties to teach their children the Golden Rule and the Ten Commandments, it falls on the schools and churches. The latter has failed in the past 30 or 40 years to do so. They seem to promote buildings and material things more than spiritual ones.

At one time, when my sons were in school, the ministers in town had a short session each Friday morning with the elementary children. They rotated turns. They did not promote their denomination, only how to deal with life. The children whose parents did not want them to participate were not included.

Eudora recently had an example of young boys left on their own too much. Luckily it was cattle killed and not people. It was a wake-up call for our community. God was watching over us that day. We can all give thanks for that.

Each of the Ten Commandments must be explained for present day living. The Sermon on the Mount explains this so all can understand.

Ethel Scott

Eudora

Commenting has been disabled for this item.